netstat: Displays protocol statistics and current TCP/IP network connections.


... The examples for the command "netstat"
... "netstat" Excerpt from Microsoft Windows Help
... Important information, tips for the "netstat" command

The command: "netstat" is on Windows 11, 10, .. available

The examples for the command "netstat"

It seems like you mean the explanations for the `NET STATISTICS` command, but your reference refers to `netstat`. Here are examples of using the `netstat` command on the Windows command line: Example 1: View all active network connections and ports

netstat

Description: This command displays a list of all active network connections and their associated ports. Example 2: View network statistics and information

netstat -s

Description: Comprehensive network statistics and information are displayed here, including receive and send statistics, errors and dropped packets. Example 3: View detailed information about network connections

netstat -an

Description: This command displays detailed information about active network connections, including IP addresses and ports in use. Example 4: Displaying listening ports

netstat -an | find "LISTENING"

Description: Only the ports that are waiting for incoming connections are displayed here. Example 5: View DNS statistics for network connections

netstat -anb

Description: This command displays DNS information alongside network connections, including associated executable files. Please note that the exact command options may vary depending on your system configuration. Use `netstat /?` in the command prompt to check the specific options and syntax details for your version of Windows.

"netstat" Excerpt from Microsoft Windows Help

Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.19045.3693]
(c) Copyright 1985-2023 Microsoft Corp.

C:\\WINDOWS>


Displays protocol statistics and current TCP/IP network connections.

NETSTAT [-a] [-b] [-e] [-n] [-o] [-p proto] [-r] [-s] [-v] [interval]

  -a            Displays all connections and listening ports.
  -b            Displays the executable involved in creating each connection or
                listening port. In some cases well-known executables host
                multiple independent components, and in these cases the
                sequence of components involved in creating the connection
                or listening port is displayed. In this case the executable
                name is in [] at the bottom, on top is the component it called,
                and so forth until TCP/IP was reached. Note that this option
                can be time-consuming and will fail unless you have sufficient
                permissions.
  -e            Displays Ethernet statistics. This may be combined with the -s
                option.
  -n            Displays addresses and port numbers in numerical form.
  -o            Displays the owning process ID associated with each connection.
  -p proto      Shows connections for the protocol specified by proto; proto
                may be any of: TCP, UDP, TCPv6, or UDPv6.  If used with the -s
                option to display per-protocol statistics, proto may be any of:
                IP, IPv6, ICMP, ICMPv6, TCP, TCPv6, UDP, or UDPv6.
  -r            Displays the routing table.
  -s            Displays per-protocol statistics.  By default, statistics are
                shown for IP, IPv6, ICMP, ICMPv6, TCP, TCPv6, UDP, and UDPv6;
                the -p option may be used to specify a subset of the default.
  -v            When used in conjunction with -b, will display sequence of
                components involved in creating the connection or listening
                port for all executables.
  interval      Redisplays selected statistics, pausing interval seconds
                between each display.  Press CTRL+C to stop redisplaying
                statistics.  If omitted, netstat will print the current
                configuration information once. 

Important information, tips for the "netstat" command

Yes, there are some important points to note when using the `netstat` command: 1. Options and Parameters: - Exact options may vary depending on operating system. Use `netstat /?` or `man netstat` (for Linux) on the command line to see the available options. 2. Admin rights: - To view all information you may need administrator rights. Therefore, run the commands as an administrator, especially if you need detailed information about all connections. 3. Active Connections: - The standard `netstat` command shows active connections. Make sure you know which connections should normally be present on your system to detect suspicious activity. 4. Filter and Sort: - Use additional options like `-a`, `-b`, `-n`, `-o`, etc. to filter or sort the display. For example, `netstat -an` displays the IP addresses and port numbers instead of using host and service names. 5. Firewall and Security: - Note that `netstat` gives you information about which network connections are active on your system. Monitor output regularly to detect suspicious activity. However, keep in mind that `netstat` alone is not enough to protect your system from security threats. 6. Understanding connection states: - The output of `netstat` contains various states such as "ESTABLISHED", "LISTENING", "TIME_WAIT", etc. Understand what these states mean to correctly interpret the network status. 7. IPv4 and IPv6: - Depending on the system configuration, `netstat` can show both IPv4 and IPv6 connections. Be careful about which address families you want to monitor. 8. Periodic Review: - Run `netstat` periodically to detect changes or unusual activity. This can help identify potential security issues early. Please note that this information is general in nature and may vary depending on the system and environment. If in doubt, it is advisable to consult specific documentation or resources for your operating system.


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Windows-10


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Windows 10 How To


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The command netstat - Displays protocol statistics and current TCP/IP network connections.

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